Handbook of the
International Phonetic Association

 

Alveolar/Dental Plosives
voiveless aspirated  -  voiceless unaspirated  -  voiced
Speech Wave        Spectrogram        Audio

  by Klaus J. Kohler

The Spanish coronal plosives are dental , voiceless unaspirated and voiced, respectively; the German ones are alveolar , voiceless aspirated and (especially in initial position) voiceless unaspirated, respectively.

In the first figure, the three glottis types of coronal plosives across the two languages are differentiated for an alveolar place of articulation.

In the second figure, the voiceless aspirated alveolar, voiceless unaspirated alveolar, voiceless unaspirated dental, voiced dental plosives are compared in this order. This means that the first two syllables represent the German, the next two the Spanish glottis contrast.

The voiceless unaspirated plosive is moreover a more forceful fortis articulation in Spanish as against the weaker lenis articulation in German: the amplitude increase in the following vowel is more abrupt in the former.


Click with left mouse button
on one of the speech signals in the upper or lower box
to listen to the sound of the alveolar plosive + [a] syllable .



Click with left mouse button
on one of the speech signals in the upper or lower box
to listen to the sound of the alveolar and dental plosive + [a] syllables.

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